Seven ways to exercise your way to great health in your older years In celebration of National Physical Fitness & Sports Month

SWIMMING
Whether you’re performing the breaststroke, taking a water aerobics class, or playing Marco Polo with the grandkids, getting in the pool is a great way to increase your cardiovascular fitness while also strengthening your muscles.

PILATES
Pilates is known for being a low-impact strength program, but its focus on core strength and stability makes it especially great for older adults.

CYCLING
Another low-impact form of exercise, cycling is ideal for those who want to increase their leg strength, but can’t run or engage in other high-impact sports due to osteoporosis or joint issues. Cycling also helps improve cardiovascular health, metabolic health, function, and cognitive performance in older adults.

WALKING
Even if you can’t find the time to perform a structured workout, you likely have time to put one foot in front of the other to get where you need to go. Walking is a great, free workout that can have a big impact on your health.

YOGA
With a holistic approach to fitness, yoga helps build muscle strength, aerobic fitness, balance, core stability, mobility, and flexibility—all of which are important for older adults.

BODYWEIGHT TRAINING
One out of every three older adults experiences severe muscle loss and when it comes to fighting age-related abdominal fat, research shows that strength training is more time-efficient compared to cardiovascular exercise.

RESISTANCE-BAND TRAINING
Resistance bands are inexpensive and beginner-friendly exercise tools that are perfect for at-home workouts. In addition, bands can help you challenge your muscles in ways you might not be able to with equipment-free training.